30 Day Get Healthy Challenge, Day 20

Back to Life Chiropractic, Gibsonia

If we are what we eat, then most of us have no idea who we really are.  Just look at the labels on some of the processed foods in your pantry and try to figure out what some of that stuff is.  And if that weren’t bad enough, did you know that there are chemicals in our foods that manufacturers aren’t even required to disclose?

If you’ve already ditched the processed foods in favor of fresh produce, you’re doing better, but can you still be sure of what you’re eating?  Most produce is grown with toxic herbicides and pesticides, not to mention that it’s also most likely genetically modified in some way.  While many industrialized nations either ban GMO foods, or at the very least require labeling, the U.S. still gives the Monstantos of the world free reign when it comes to our food supply.

Unless you’re getting local organic produce from a trusted source, the only way to control what you are eating is to grow it yourself.  It’s easier than you think.  Two books on the subject that I highly recommend are Square Foot Gardening and Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre.  Both will teach you how to grow a high-yield garden on a small plot.  Of course, there will be some trial and error early on, but the payoff is invaluable.

An excellent resource for organic seeds is Seed Savers Exchange. They are a non-profit whose mission is to save and share heirloom seeds.

To start small and try your hand at gardening you can simply grow a couple things that you eat frequently, like tomatoes or peppers.  You can literally use a wooden crate or small plywood box (make sure the wood is untreated) that you keep on your patio or near your door.

A tomato fresh off the stem is all the incentive you’ll need to keep developing your green thumb.

Dr. Joseph Tsai, D.C.

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